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Goats, gripes, and grasping for greatness
Books: Dragon Ship (e-ARC) 
2nd-May-2012 12:10 pm
Today to Read
In everything else that is going on, I forgot to mention that I finished Dragon Ship electronic Advanced Reader Copy on, um, Sunday?. I forget. Anyway...

Dragon Ship, by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Science Fiction; electronic copy. Fourth in the Theo Waitley series; Sixteenth novel in the Liaden Universe; Eighteenth book in the Liaden Universe...

There was more action in Dragon Ship than in previous Theo books, including station invasions and personal confrontations. Unfortunately, a lot of the action and flow was choppy and the transitions from scene to scene were abrupt, in part because of the authors' desire to present the action from multiple points of view. From a quick mental survey, I'd say that there are at least seven points of view on offer in the book, and one major recurring historical flashback-point. There are no satisfactory resolutions offered in this book, only satisfactory battles. I didn't even think the point of [Spoiler Here] was much of a resolution. I did find out that Kamele is less of an oblivious flake than I thought, and that Havelin is still alive. Those are nice bits of information.

Irrelevant to the plot, I admit to some self-satisfaction in a scene on one of their trade partner visits, when Theo decides to emulate her father in putting out a don't-look-here aura to get people to stop staring. She is immediately repremanded by the local ladies for attempting a "major working" without warning, and so she is both excessively confused and confusing, because she confesses to not being taught at all, but learning that kind of thing from observation of her father (What? A man?)

This book, more than many, leans heavily on the reader's previous knowledge of characters and circumstances in order to move onward with the plot. I am wondering if this is a Book Four flaw of the authors, as Plan B was the least explicative and fastest moving of the original story line, and relied heavily on implication and historical knowledge to get the readers through the action.

And like Plan B, this story arc is not concluded. We have one more player in place now, and one more player elevated in the game, but things are only just being set up. At this point, Daav is off planet (on mission), Theo is off with Bechimo, and various Old Tech is coming awake again. I guess we just get to tune in.

I recommend this to Liaden addicts.
I picked this up because, well, see above.

New-to-me Books for 2012

January
House of the Star by Caitlin Brennan, YA fantasy. 282 pages; hardback; stand-alone. 3/5 stars on Goodreads (3 = "liked it"), 4/5 stars on Amazon (4 = "liked it"); straight into the giveawaybox (eta: gone)
Gwenhwyfar by Mercedes Lackey, Fantasy. 404 pages; hardback; stand-alone. 2/5 stars on Goodreads (2 = "it was OK"), 3/5 stars on Amazon (3 = "it was OK"); straight into the giveawaybox (eta: gone)
Blood Engines by T.A. Pratt, Urban fantasy. 336 pages; paperback; first in the series. 3/5 stars on Goodreads (3 = "liked it"), 4/5 stars on Amazon (4 = "liked it"); going to keep it around and loan it to friends
Hexed edited by uncredited, listed under the first author, Ilona Andrews. Urban Fantasy, 326 pages. Paperback; anthology of four novellas. 3/5 stars on Goodreads, 4/5 stars on Amazon; going to loan it to friends who like Kate Daniels, then likely give it away.
Paranormalcy, by Kiersten White. YA Fantasy, 335 pages. Hardback; first in the series. [3/5 on Goodreads] Giveawaybox. (eta: gone)
Stormwalker, by Allyson James. Urban Fantasy, 330 pages. Paperback; first in the series. [3/5 on Goodreads] Giveawaybox. (eta: gone)
The Girl of Fire and Thorns, by Rae Carson. YA Fantasy, 423 pages. Hardback, stand-alone. [3/5 on Goodreads] Giveawaybox. (eta: gone)
Shadow Ops: Control Point, by Myke Cole. Urban Fantasy... sort of... 382 pages. Paperback, first in the series. [4/5 on Goodreads] Giveawaybox.

February
Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson, fantasy. 672 pages. Paperback; first in the series.[4/5 on Goodreads] Borrowed.
Westward Weird edited by Martin Greenberg and Kerrie Hughes. Hell-if-I-know, 302 pages. Paperback, anthology. [3/5 on Goodreads] Giveawaybox.
Discount Armageddon, by Seanan McGuire. Urban fantasy, 360 pages. Paperback; first in the series. Keeping it for now.

March
Fair Game, by Patricia Briggs, Urban fantasy. 293 pages; hardback; third in the series. Keeping it.
The Modern Fae's Guide to Surviving Humanity, edited by Joshua Palmatier and Patricia Bray, Urban fantasy. 308 pages; paperback; anthology. Giveawaybox.
Tempting Danger, by Eileen Wilks. Paranormal romance, 301 pages. Paperback, first in the series. Giveawaybox.
Too Much Information, by Gene Ambaum and Bill Barnes. Comic book, 127 pages. Paperback. 9th in the series. Keeping it.
Touch of Power, by Maria V. Snyder. Fantasy romance. 390 pages, paperback. First in the series. Giveawaybox.
Out Whom Shall We Gross?, by Brooke McEldowney. Comic book. 87 pages, paperback. First in the series. Keeping it.
Sonata for Piano and Armpit, by Brooke McEldowney. Comic book. 87 pages, paperback. Second in the series. Keeping it.
Sphinx's Princess, by Esther Friesner. YA Fantasy. 365 pages, paperback. First in the duology. It was a loan.
Sphinx's Queen, by Esther Friesner. YA Fantasy. 347 pages, paperback. Second in the duology. It was a loan.

April
Bone Shop, by T. A. Pratt. Urban Fantasy. Online. Prequel to the Marla Mason series.
Kitemaster and Other Stories, by Jim C. Hines. Fantasy. e-book anthology.
How is that Underling Thing Working out for You?, by Scott Adams. 128 pages, paperback. Comic. Keeping it.
Teamwork Means You Can't Pick the Side That's Right by Scott Adams. 128 pages, paperback. Comic. Keeping it.
The Sentinel Mage, by Emily Gee. Fantasy. 509 pages, paperback. First in the trilogy. It was a loan.

May
Dragon Ship, by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller. e-ARC. Science Fiction. Fourth in the series; 14th in the Universe.


In case you want back references, here is the Books for 2011 round-up post
Comments 
9th-May-2012 09:34 pm (UTC)
Hey, what's your policy on loaning out ebooks? I'll be buying this when it comes out, but I'd love to get an early ready (but not at $15).
10th-May-2012 01:26 pm (UTC)
That's a darned good question. I don't have a policy, as of yet, because 1) no one has asked and 2) I still don't know how to "lend" something that I still would have access to even after I passed it onward. Do you have any good ideas?
10th-May-2012 03:03 pm (UTC)
I think it becomes a technical _vs_ morals issue. The assumption is that there's no weird copy protection thing on the baen book (which is my experience). The second assumption is that no matter what this comes down to the honor system.

The fast and loose way would be to simply email me the file, and not look at your copy until I let you know I was done, and had deleted my copy.

The more stringent way would be for you to move it onto something like a usb drive, delete the original downloaded copy, and physically pass it back and forth. Of course, you still have the option to re-download it whenever you want, so even then we're back onto the honor system.

It all comes down to what you're comfortable with, and I'm certainly not trying to get you to do something that'll bother you in the least.
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